Conqueror Streets

Among its commercial streets by excellence, Stonegate and Petergate, that still today are where 2,000 years ago were the Roman roads of Praetoria and Principalis, and that guide us to the great Gothic Cathedral in York, where they emphasize its stained glass Windows. It took more than 250 years to build, until it was consecrated in 1472. But to evoke that medieval past there to wander through Coffee Yard, Swinegate, Grape Lane, Mad Alice Lane and Shambles, its most picturesque alley and says the oldest shopping street in Europe. Essential in York although there are many points that deserve worthwhile visit, there are some that are essential. In this city that receives over seven million visitors a year, one of those places is Jorvik.

Closely linked to the Vikings, it is probably the best-known place in the environment. Unearthed in 1976, allows you to capture the atmosphere and lifestyle of the era through houses, workshops and utensils typical of that time. Among its cobbled streets arise great secrets, including Fairfax House, which hosts an important collection of furniture and clocks of the 17TH and 18th centuries. A return to the medieval past involve visits to Barley Hall, Merchant Adventurers Hall and Guild Hall. The great symbol of the power of the English Kings had during that time is the Tower of Clifford. Originally built by William the Conqueror, was thrown down on two occasions, by until Enrique III rebuilt it finally. From here you can enjoy the best views of the city and its surroundings, and one begins to understand the reasons that converted to York point strategic to control the North of England. The mysteries appear in Treauser’s House, where it is said that they have been ghosts of Roman soldiers.

For those eligible and willing to strong emotions, York Dungeon explores them more grey times of the city through special ctos and actors, in an interactive and terrifying spectacle. Reopened on August 1, 2010, the Yorkshire Museum houses one of the best archaeological and geological collections in Europe. Meanwhile, at the Museum of the castle of York one will believe have regressed in the time plying its streets; experiencing and living more Victorian England. But if there is a unique exhibition space that is the National Railway Museum, which recreates a large station of the 1950s. In the devotion of the city by the means of transport must not be forgotten that when the current station building was opened in 1877, it was considered the highest railway station in Europe. Source of the news: York, a history of mysteries

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